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Archive for June, 2012

Checklist: When purchasing a used RIB

posted by The Captain @ 8:23 PM
Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Hull & Deck

Inspect the hull for cracks, chips and grazing, in particular along the spray rails and chines. Hairline cracks running across the beam of the hull and any longitudinal cracks are the principal elements to look out for. Either of these could indicate substantial damage. Minor grazing, small star cracks (stress) emanating from pressure points and chips in the chines may detract from the boat’s appearance, but are usually superficial and require a relatively easy and inexpensive repair job.

Deck and transom damage is rare. However, points to look for are spongy decks caused by fuel or water logging. The problem will require the attention of an expert and a great deal of expense. Check the transom around its base and its bearer’s knees. Minor cracks in both the base and at the top of the knees can be common, but generally do not indicate major damage. Nevertheless, check carefully.

Seating and console upholstery condition are visually easy to see, but do check the deck attachment of the console, the seat hinges and the watertightness of any integral storage areas.

Check the location of fuel tanks and battery, do you really want them both located in the same deck space? One spark and perhaps a ‘bang’! Inspect all fittings, pipes and breathers for signs of damage. Check out accessibility if a damaged fuel tank has to be replaced. This can be quite expensive if the design and construction has not taken this possibility into account.

Tubes

Inspect the buoyancy tubes for major repairs. Check for half stuck patches as they are a good indicator of an amateur repair job and consequent hidden dangers. Such patches should be attended to as soon as possible.

Check for previous repairs to the tube attachment, usually spotted by glue stains. Pull at the fabric, to check that any gluing has been carried out properly. In particular check the seam at the bow, along each underside of the hull, the transom seams and the joining of the stern tube cones.

A lot of seams are covered by tape that can start to lift or become totally detached. While on some boats, the tape is purely a protective measure covering the main seam below (a little glue is all that is needed to rectify the problem) on others it is the main attachment. In the case of the latter, then this can be the beginning of the seams becoming unglued, which entails an expensive repair job.

The RIB should have a minimum of 3 independent air chambers, preferably more. To check the condition of the baffles (the divisions between the air chambers) deflate one tube at a time and inflate the other to a normal working pressure, 1.5 to 3.0 psi. With your ‘good’ ear pressed against the tube you should be able to hear any leakage of air from one chamber to another.

Engine & Steering

An inspection by a qualified person is the ideal solution; however, if this is not always possible, we do suggest that you carry out the following checks:

Remove the cowl and inspect the engine for general condition, a clean engine often indicates a careful owner. Look for signs of salt corrosion, most importantly around the cylinder head. With the engine running check that the water pump is functioning properly, pumping a sufficient volume of water to cool the engine. Look at the strength of the ‘tell tail’ which will give you a good indication. Overheating can cause serious damage to the pistons and bearings as well as twisting the cylinder head.

Check for wear in the swivel bracket and engine mounts by attempting to shake the engine, RIBs put huge loads on the engine mountings and suffer from this type of deterioration if the engine has not been properly checked and fittings tightened after every trip.

Check the propeller for damage and look to see if the bottom of the ‘skeg’ is also damaged, usually indicating that the engine has hit something at sometime. Take the engine out of gear (with ignition switched off!) and rotate the prop slowly by hand, checking to ensure that the propeller shaft is not bent. Again with the ignition switched off or the kill-cord out, put the engine in gear and pull the starter cord or turn the propeller by hand. You should be able to feel a resistance as each piston rises to compress the air in its cylinders.

Loosen the gearbox oil drainage plug and inspect what comes out. The oil should be thick and transparent. If it is not and appears to be thinner and murky, then water contamination may have taken place and consequently damaged the gears or bearings.

Ask to see a service history. You will probably be very lucky to find one, some enthusiasts do all their own servicing and maintenance.

Steering, usually cable or hydraulic on some of the larger engines or a combination of both. Check the free movement of all cables, it’s not uncommon for steering cables to seize. It’s recommended changing them anyway on a routine basis. Not expensive but sometimes fiddly. Check condition of all fittings to steering box and engine. If hydraulic steering, check oil level and look for leaks. Move steering and check for ‘play’.

General Equipment

Personal choice largely dictates what equipment should be on the RIRIB, expect that not every pre-owned (let alone new) RIB will come complete with all the equipment considered to be prudent to take to sea. The British Inflatable Boat Owners Association sets down its requirements for members who take their RIBs on the more challenging events and these can be found at: www.biboa.co.uk To give you a general idea we have listed below some items that should be considered as part of the purchase of a used RIB.

Anchor and Line

An anchor of a weight and type adequate to hold the boat with at least 30 metres (inshore), 50 metres (offshore) of line with 3 metres of chain.

 

Bailers and Bilge Pumps

Bailers or buckets and either manual, automatic or electric bilge pumps (particularly on inboard engine installations).

 

Fire Extinguisher

A fire extinguisher. Inboard engines should have an automatic fire extinguisher system installed in the engine compartment.

Hand or Foot Pump

A hand or foot pump capable of being operated below the gunwale.


SeaEagle.com

Paddles

A minimum of two paddles.

Painter/Mooring Lines

Painter and mooring lines. The painter should be shorter than the length of the boat so as not to foul the propeller should it fall into the water whilst underway.

Towing Points

Cleats, eyes and samson posts strong enough to tow the boat when waterlogged.

The items above are those which mainly ‘look after the boat’. Other important safety items, e.g. compass, flares, lifejackets, VHF radio, medical kit, charts, etc., should be carried. You can obtain professional advice on these items from your local maritime safety agency or national boating association.

Trailer

Used trailers are generally in a poor condition and can sometimes seem to be more of a liability than an asset. (But not always, especially if the RIB has been regularly moved from cruise to cruise area). Ensure it fits the boat, providing sufficient support, and determine the existence and extent of rust, particularly in any box sections.

Brakes often become seized due to their frequent immersion in salt water, so don’t be put off immediately if this is the case. However, do check carefully how easily they release. Inspect the cables, making sure they appear to be good condition. Lastly, check the brakes don’t scrape or bind when the trailer is being towed.

Jack up the trailer and check for play in the wheel bearings. Also spin the wheel, listening for noise from the bearings. If the bearings are noisy, then the trailer is not in a good state to tow the boat. Always carry a spare wheel bearing when towing on road.

Check the Draw Bar and Hitch ensuring that the coupling bolts are tight. Brake the trailer and attempt to manoeuvre the hitch, checking for wear. Try to push the hitch back towards the trailer, it should slide slowly with some resistance. It should not slip in easily or seize up.

Winch mechanism; check the strap for deterioration. If there is a winch wire, then you’re better off replacing it with a strap, as this is a much safer option. Inspect the winch mechanism for jammed or worn pawls.

Trailer board; check that there is one, and that all lights are working.

Finally: – Try your prospective RIB buy on the water.

Check List – Buying a RIB?

Make/Model ………………………………….. Year ……….. Price ……….

First impression/general condition…………………………………………….

 

Hull & Deck Good Fair Poor Engine & Steering Good Fair Poor
Cracks/chips/grazing General engine condition
Spongy deck Signs of salt corrosion
Deck/Transom cracks Cooling – ‘tell tail’
Console condition Swivel bracket movement – outboards
Seating/Upholstery condition Engine mountings movement
Storage watertightness Propeller & skeg condition
Location of fuel tank(s) & batteries Propeller shaft check
Compression check
Tubes Gearbox oil condition
Patches Steering cables freedom of movement
Glue stains Steering cable fittings
Bow seam adhesion Hydraulic oil check & leaks
Port side seam adhesion Steering play
Starboard side seam adhesion
Transom seams adhesion Trailer
Aft tube cone seams Boat properly supported
Baffles condition Extent of rust
Condition of cables
General Equipment Release of brakes
Anchor & Line Wheel bearings condition
Bailers & Bilge pumps Draw Bar & Hitch condition
Fire Extinguisher Winch Mechanism
Hand/Foot pump
Paddles Sea Trial
Painter/Mooring lines
Towing Points Tick relevant box

This RIB buying guide courtesy of: www.hotribs.com

View inflatable boat products, accessories and other innovative boat and marine products here.


Sea Eagle Fisherman's Dream Kit

Outboard Engine Information

posted by The Captain @ 3:39 PM
Tuesday, June 12, 2012

What size of HP?

Thanks to their light weight and exceptional lift, inflatable boats plane with lower power outboards. To determine the correct motor HP size for your boat, follow the recommended power output:

NEVER USE A MOTOR POWER HP HIGHER THAN INDICATED ON THE MANUFACTURER’S I.D. PLATE AS THIS COULD RESULT IN LOSS OF CONTROL

  • Over-powered and your boat can be difficult to control. Under no circumstances should you fit an outboard which exceeds the maximum permitted engine power: you may be breaking the law.
  • Under-powered and you may not have that margin of security necessary to go upwind or against the currents.
  • For quiet activities you do not need a very powerful engine: 8 hp is sufficient for a 4.20m/13’9″ boat.
  • For sportier activities such as water skiing or diving you will need at least 30 hp.
  • With smaller outboards, go for tiller control, giving direct control over the boat and allowing for quick maneuvering.
  • Above 25 hp, for greater comfort and safety, we recommend that you choose a steering console.

It is recommended that you choose a motor suitable for your principal boating activities. The recommended and maximum powers are given in the technical specifications.

 

The weight of the outboard

The weight of the outboard has a direct effect on the handling of your inflatable boat.

  • For the same power output, choose the lighter outboard
  • Check that the engine’s weight is compatible with the maximum recommended weight for your boat.

 

Shaft length of the motor (short, long or extra-long)

  • Each model has been designed to accept one length, not all.

 


SeaEagle.com

Propeller

  • Your motor may come equipped with a “standard” propeller. Ask your dealer to assist you in choosing the optimum propeller for your principal use.

 

Installing the motor

  • Install the motor along the centerline of the inflatable boat, in the middle of the tightening plate (1) (see diagram)
  • Fully tighten the brackets (2) by hand and check that they are still properly tightened after 15 minutes of running.
  • Secure the motor to the loop (4) on the motor tightening plate (1) with a safety cable (3).

 

Adjusting the tilt of the motor

To get the best performance and maneuverability, you may have to adjust the tilt (the angle of the motor to the transom) more often in relation to navigation conditions.

In a calm sea, the motor must be positioned so that the axis of the propeller is parallel to the water. But an adjustment of the tilt is recommended under certain other conditions:

The adjustment can be manual or by an electric trim, if supplied with the engine. The trim is a hydraulic control that inclines the motor in navigation.

Usually:

  • If the motor is positively trimmed, the boat will porpoise.
  • If the boat is negatively trimmed, the boat will nose down.

 

 

 

When to use the positive trim:

  • In a following sea: load the stern and if necessary set the tilt pin in the 3rd or 4th hole position (manual trim)
  • When you want to increase speed (electric trim)

 

When to use the negative trim:

  • With a head on sea and wind: load the bow and if necessary set the tilt pin in the 1st or 2nd hole position (manual trim)
  • When planing to minimize the porpoiseing (electric trim)

 

NEVER USE A MOTOR POWER HP HIGHER THAN INDICATED ON THE MANUFACTURER’S I.D. PLATE AS THIS COULD RESULT IN LOSS OF CONTROL.

Photos and information courtesy of Zodiac Canada – www.zodiac.ca

View inflatable boat products, accessories and other innovative boat and marine products here.


Sea Eagle Fisherman's Dream Kit

Wakeboarding Maneuvers and Terminology

posted by The Captain @ 1:01 PM
Monday, June 11, 2012

The following info was borrowed from Wikipedia under the GNU Free Documentation License.

Wakeboarding stunts

As with many freestyle sports such as snowboarding and surfing, there is almost a separate language of terms to describe various tricks in wakeboarding. The more height, the more “pop”. So therefore the rider’s edge is very important to the height of the jump. Heading towards the wake chest facing the boat is known as a heelside edge; approaching from the other direction with chest facing away from the boat is known as toeside edge. A typical beginner to intermediate rider will tend to have an easier time hitting the wake heelside because it tends to come more naturally to them, while more advanced riders can hit the wake both heelside as well as toeside.

Surface Tricks

Surface tricks are tricks that are performed when the rider is not airborne. Examples are:

 

  • Backside Butterslide- Rider turns the wakeboard backside 90 degrees and grinds the wake.
  • Backside Butterslide 180- Rider turns the board backside 90 degrees and grinds the wake. Rider then grabs the handle with opposite hand and does another 90 degree turn in the same direction.
  • Backside Start- Rider gets up in a backside position where the backside is facing the boat.
  • Body Slide- Rider lies back onto the water.
  • Butterslide- Rider turns the board frontside 90 degrees and grinds the wake.
  • Butterslide 180- Same as regular butterslide but with an additional 90 degree rotation in the same direction.
  • Perez- Rider carves outside of the wake and slides into a surface 360.
  • Potato Peeler- Body Slide with fin release.
  • Powerslide- Wakeboardis turned backside 90 degrees in the flats. Fins are broken loose. If done correctly, it creates a huge spray.
  • Surf Carve- Rider cuts back and forth in the wake in a surf-carving fashion.
  • Surface 180- A 180 degree turn on the surface of the water.
  • Surface 360- A 360 degree turn on the surface of the water.
  • Ollie- A bunny-hop out of the water.

Shop ski, wake, snowboard at evogear.com

Spins

A spin is done by the rider rotating around, like snowboarding. The name of the spin refers to the number of degrees rotated:

  • 180
  • 360
  • 540
  • 720
  • 900
  • 1080
  • 1260

Spin Terminology

  • Backside- A spin where the rider rotates with the back of their body towards the boat first. Originally referred to as blindside or blind spins, although this terminology has fallen out of favor.
  • Baller- This is a term used for when a rider does the handle pass of their spin by passing the handle between their legs. Invented by Parks and Shane Bonifay.
  • Flatline Spin/Orbital- A spin where the rider goes over the rope instead of passing the handle.
  • Frontside- A spin where the rider rotates with the front of their body towards the boat first.
  • Off-Axis- When a rider does a spin but goes off the vertical axis so the board usually gets up to shoulder level or above. Invented by Marshall Harrington. Also called “Monkey” and “Corked” spins. Will Ellis was the first rider to land an Off-Axis 900.
  • Ole- When a rider rotates with the handle above his head, not passing the handle.
  • Osmosis- When the rider performs a spin by tossing the handle from one hand to the same hand again, bypassing the other hand. Invented by Shaun Murray.
  • Rewind- A spin where the rider does a shifty one way, then back the other, then spins back in the direction of their initial shifty.
  • Shifty- Board is shifted 90 degrees in one direction and then shifted back in the opposite direction. Gregg Necrason was the first rider to land a shifty 540.
  • To Blind- The rider does a backside 180 and lands with the rope in their backs or they can do a handle pass
  • Wrapped- When the rider has the rope wrapped around their back they are going to perform a wrapped trick. It allows a rider to spin without doing a handle pass. It also allows the rider to perform unique grabs that usually cannot be done when passing the handle.

For more tricks, click here.

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evo | Wake

Wakeboard General Information and History

posted by The Captain @ 12:51 PM
Monday, June 11, 2012

The following info was borrowed from Wikipedia under the GNU Free Documentation License.

Wakeboarding is a surface water sport which involves riding a wakeboard over the surface of a body of water behind a boat or Cable System . It was developed through a combination of water skiing, snowboarding and surfing techniques.

The rider is towed behind xi boat or a cable park; typically at speeds of 18-24 miles per hour (29-38 km/h), depending on water conditions, rider’s weight, board size and most importantly, the rider’s personal preference. Wakeboarding can also be performed on a variety of media including closed-course cables, winches, PWCs and ATVs.

Riding

Using edging techniques, the rider can move outside of the wake or cut rapidly in toward the wake. Jumps are performed by hitting the wake and launching into the air. This can also be done by hitting a kicker (a jump). There is also the slider (a rail bar) in which a rider approaches and rides along keeping his balance. Once a rider improves in the sport, he or she can progress to tricks high in the air. As the rope tightens the rider gains speed toward the wake. When the rider goes airborne, the tightened rope launches him and while in the air, at which point the rider may attempt to do tricks.

Personalize

Different styles of wakeboards have various shapes and sizes. With this in mind, it’s important to keep personal preference and weight in mind. The larger the board (width and length), the better it floats and edges. Larger boards also make it more difficult to perform advanced tricks.

In addition, riding styles are determined by a boards camber. Manufacturers refer to this as the boards “rocker.” The two main rockers are known as the Continuous and the Three-Stage. A Continuous rocker, self-spoken, has a continuous curve throughout the top sheet. These allow for a smoother, faster ride without surface resistance. The Three-Stage rocker is made up of a flat center and abrupt changes to the tail and nose. This design was manufactured to provide more “pop” when launching off of the boats wake, allowing for more hang-time (time spent in the air).

Most wakeboards are designed and manufactured with fins. Some are molded into the board; others are detachable usually made out of aluminum, carbon fiber, or plastic. Each design determines how aggressive the board will track (“catch”) the water. Although designs cannot be altered, fins of different sizes are sold separately to better personalize the ride. Advanced riders are sometimes known to remove the fins while beginners will use them to provide better stability.
Shop ski, wake, snowboard at evogear.com
Development of the sport

Wakeboarding arose in the late 1980s after the advent of Skiboarding.

Incorrectly thought to be originally created by a surfer named Tony Finn in the mid 1980′s ‘Ski-boarding’ or ‘Skurfing’ then wakeboarding, was actually created in New Zealand by surfboard shaper Allan Byrne and friends such as Kevin Jarrett. Allan Byrne lent a ‘Skurf board’ to Jeff Darby and friends in Queensland Australia who started to make their own and who later came in contact with Tony Finn who was to later produce their brand ‘Skurfer’ under royalty.

Recently in Wakeboard Magazine in June of 2008 a photo surfaced and was published from pre 1979 of Ron Seidenglanz and Robb Seidenglanz surfing a wake being towed behind a boston whaler in Corona Del Mar California. As an adult Ron Seidenglanz spent from age 24 on to now, over 16 years making wake board films and pushing the envelope of documentation while developing a family business as Sidwayz Films. Developing the sport with as many people as possible thou documentation and community organization and love of film making. You decide which way to look at the history of wake boarding.

Many years prior to Tony Finn and the ‘Skurfer’, Australian surfboard shaper and inventor Bruce McKee launched in Australia 1982, the world’s first mass-produced plastic, roto-moulded construction ski-board (Skurfboard) named the ‘Mcski’, later ‘SSS’ skiboard and later ‘Wake-snake’. The board had adjustable rubber foot-straps, concave tunnel bottom and a keel fin. Two smaller side fins were later added for greater hold and more manoeuverability.

Bruce McKee and associate Mitchell Ross negotiated with USA’s Medalist Waterskis and the first American production was launched. The launch of the product, American version being named the ‘Surf-Ski’ was in 1984 at Chicagos ‘IMTEC’show. At the show McKee also met Tony Finn who would be the proposed Californian representative. Tony Finn, went on to do his own negotiations with Darby and company from Australia and the result as mentioned above were the US boards later launched under the ‘Skurfer’ brand name.

The term “wakeboard” was coined by Porter Daughtry (Brooks, GA), as well as the concept and design, along with his brother Murray and a Pro snowboarder they sponsored. Paul approached Herb O’Brien with the idea and the introduction of the “hyperlite” wakeboard, named by Eric “The Flyin Hawaiian” Perez, laid the groundwork for evolution of the wakeboard throughout the 1990s. Liquid Force was started by Finn and Redmond.

The World Skiboard Association was founded in 1989 and the First World Skiboard Championships was held on the Island of Kauai, Hawaii, on the Wailua River. The next year Eric Perez defended his title against Darin Shapiro. This is when the Hyperlite wakeboard was introduced and blew everyone away. The first US Nationals were held later that same year in Colorado Springs, CO on Prospect lake, hosted by Tommy Phillips. Competitions began popping up and around the United States throughout the early 1990s. Wakeboarding was added as a competitive sport in the X Games II. The World Skiboard Association “changed its focus” and was re-named the World Wakeboard Association.

View wakeboarding accessories here.

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evo | Wake

Wakeboard Tricks and Information

posted by The Captain @ 12:40 PM
Monday, June 11, 2012

Indy Bone

Description: Nosebone or Tailbone with toeside grab between feet

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 450

Melancholy

Description: Front hand rear heelside grab

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 450

Crail

Description: Rear hand front toeside grab, bone out back leg

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 500

Double Bind 180

Description: Blindside 2 wake 180 w/two hands behind back approach.

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 500

Double Blind Half Cab

Description: Blindside back-to-front w/two hands behind the back approach.

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 500

Indy Stiffy

Description: Stiffy with toeside grab

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 500

Rocket Air

Description: Tailbone with two handed forward grab on tip

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 500

Canadian Bacon

Description: Stiffy with heelside grab

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 525

Slob Heli

Description: Toeside grab and rotate 360 degrees (1 or 2 wakes)

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 650

Tumble Turn

Description: Rider goes onto the surface w/ back touching and rotates, then back to normal stance

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 700

FS/BS 540 wrap or hand pass (1 wake)

Description: Rider uses wake to get air and rotate a full 360 plus a half (180)

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 850

Backside Back Roll

Description: Heelside Back Roll

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1050

FS/BS 540 wrap or hand pass (2 wakes)

Description: Same as 1-wake 540, but must clear both wakes

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1050

Blender

Description: Backside Roll w/ wrap heli

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1075

Backside Roll-to-Revert

Description: Heelside back roll-to-fakie landing

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1100

Fontside Back Roll

Description: Toeside Back Roll

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1100

Shifty 360

Description: Twister past 90 degrees, then reverse into 360 rotation in other direction

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1100

Backside Front Roll

Description: Heelside Front Roll

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1150

Frontside Front Roll

Description: Toeside Front Roll

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1150

Frontside Roll-to-Revert

Description: Toeside back roll-to-fakie landing

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1150

Backside Air Half Cab Roll

Description: Heelside backroll-fakie approach/front landing without using the wake for air

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1200

Frontside Half Cab Roll

Description: Toeside backroll-fakie approach/ front landing

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1200

Shop ski, wake, snowboard at evogear.com

Tantrum

Description: Backflip, body first in the direction of the take off

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1200

Backside Air Raley

Description: Starting heelside, rider goes into air and raises board above the body (pushing the board up – inverted)

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1250

Backside Front Flip

Description: Starting heelside, rider uses wake to get air and flips forward, board over head

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1250

Frontside Air Half Cab Roll

Description: Toeside backroll-fakie approach/ front landing without using the wake for air

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1250

Frontside Front Flip

Description: Starting toeside, rider uses wake to get air and flips forward, board over head

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1250

FS/BS 540 Hand pass (2 wakes)

Description: Same as 2-wake wrap 540, but handle must exchange hands behind back.

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1250

Tantrum-to-fakie

Description: Tantrum with a fakie landing

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1250

Tootsie Roll

Description: Front roll to Blindside 180

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1250

Air Front Flip

Description: Front flip without using the wake for air

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1275

Front Flip-to-Fakie

Description: Front flip with half twist-to-fakie landing

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1300

Frontside Air Raley

Description: Starting toeside, rider goes into air and raises board above the body (pushing the board up – inverted)

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1300

Blind Judge

Description: Backside Raley to Blindside 180

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1350

Half Cab Front Flip

Description: Front flip with fakie approach/front landing

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1350

Shifty 540

Description: Twister past 90 degrees, then reverse into 540 rotation in other direction

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1350

Backside 720 (2 wakes)

Description: Heelside double 360 Heli’s crossing both wakes

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1500

Frontside 720 (2 wakes)

Description: Toeside double 360 Heli’s crossing both wakes

Category: Advanced

Point Value: 1500

 

View wakeboarding accessories here.

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evo | Wake

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